CIG Newsletter

Select one
* = required field

powered by MailChimp!

2014 Fundraiser

Raised $5,500 towards the $30,000 target.
We're raising money for new training materials. Learn more!
Visit our DONATE PAGE or contact your region about helping out on a local level.
promoslider-volunteer-vert-181x300
Improv_U_Logo_Blue-CIG-bottom

Proudly Sponsored By:

Proudly Sponsored By:

Practice Games

CIG-Nationals-2008-802-150px

Refresh to randomize the game

Scene with Character Triggers

Applying basic character work to scenes.

Rules:

Two or three students are onstage. Each student in the scene will be given a word. Students will use that word to inspire a character; students are given a moment to repeat the word and to find the physical/vocal elements of that character. Students are then given a

Continue reading:
Scene with Character Triggers

Animal Actors

A great game to explore non-human habitual movement.

Rules:

Improvisers ask for an animal or animals to inspire their characters. The team then plays the scene as a human with that animal’s characteristics.


Objectives:

To use the Animals inherent talents and well known traits to solve problems (or create them) and create

Continue reading:
Animal Actors

Dubbing

Rules:

Offstage improvisers provide the voices for the onstage characters and action. May be played as a Foreign Film.


Objectives:

To perform a scene with the narrative being supplied by one part of team and the physicalization by the other.


Comments:

The onstage improvisors have the option of simply

Continue reading:
Dubbing

Moving People

Rules:

Audience members or team-mates provide the locomotion for the improvisers on stage. Improvisers may not move any part of their own bodies (except to provide dialogue by moving their mouths). Movers should put the “puppets” in challenging positions, and puppets should challenge the puppeteers with their verbal endowments.


Objectives:

To improvise

Continue reading:
Moving People

Three Rules

A simple introduction to games/rules in scenework.

Rules:

Three students stand on stage. Each is given the suggestion of a rule that will govern their scene, for example: “Sarah can’t say the letter S, Dan can only use the right side of his body, and Marika screams whenever someone talks about the weather.” A regular

Continue reading:
Three Rules

Object Game

Rules:

Object is chosen from a member of the audience. Scene is played using that object. It may or may not be used as what it really is (eg: credit card may be used as a pocket TV…).


Objective:

To improvise and justify a complete scene within the rules of the game.

Continue reading:
Object Game

Animal Allegory

An interesting approach to character and narration (answer an origin question, self directed narration).

Rules:

Two students are onstage. Each is given the suggestion of a different animal to play. Additionally, the suggestion of an “origin question” is given (Why is the sky blue? Where do babies come from? Why is there a moon?) Students

Continue reading:
Animal Allegory

Inner Voices

Inner voices is a classic game normally used solely as a comic device. Teams have recently found it to be a great game to explore the life event.

Rules:

A suggestion is received from the audience (of the teams choosing.) Main characters do a linear scene about a pivotal moment. An additional player for each

Continue reading:
Inner Voices

Evil Twin

A justification game that challenges the “straight man.”

Rules:

Three players stand onstage. Two players will improvise a scene. The other player is one of those player’s evil twin. At any point in the scene, the twin can shout, “Freeze!” after which he/she tags out their twin, and continues the scene by doing something “evil.”

Continue reading:
Evil Twin

Scene 3 Ways

A great way to play with many different styles

Rules:

Team plays a short neutral scene. The team replays the scene 2 more times coloured with the elements of a particular style or genre.


Objectives:

To improvise within many different styles. Create and practice the understanding of using an element of a

Continue reading:
Scene 3 Ways

He Said/She Said

A great endowment game.

Rules:

Two players stand onstage. The first player speaks a line of dialogue. Each player will state the action the other player must perform, followed by his/her own line. For example: 1. “I want a divorce” 2: “She said, while grabbing a knife from the kitchen table.” At this point player

Continue reading:
He Said/She Said

Rollercoaster

Rules:

Players begin a scene on a suggestion from the audience. A moderator the calls out different Styles or Emotions. When a new Style or Emotion is called out the players must continue the same scene justifying the new element.


Objectives:

To justify the transitions while creating a scene.


Continue reading:
Rollercoaster

Fairy Tale Perspective

The fairy tale perspective game is a perfect first step into perspective narration.

Rules:

A famous fairy tale and the secondary character whose perspective we will see it from are solicited from the audience. The Secondary character begins a monologue which introduces them as the narrator and describes the environment and characters. As these elements

Continue reading:
Fairy Tale Perspective

Audience Character

Rules:

Get photo ID cards or business cards from the audience as well as a suggestion of a location or activity. Designated players mold/match their faces to the photos. They also use the name from the ID as well. The scene is created by showing the characters within the suggestions from the audience.


Continue reading:
Audience Character

Word Machine

Rules:

A member of the audience (or one member of the team) is invited on stage to become the Word Machine. They offer random single words whenever a player taps one of their outstretched fists. The players begin a scene and tap the word machine’s hand mid-speech, the moment they need an offer. The word

Continue reading:
Word Machine

Entrances & Exits

Rules:

Each player is given a word, number or famous phrase (preferably not something said in every sentence.) Whenever the player’s word is spoken within the scene the player must justify an entrance or an exit.


Objectives:

To improvise and justify within the rules of the game while creating a scene.


Continue reading:
Entrances & Exits

Sounds Like a Song

A painless entrée into the world of musical improv.

Rules:

Students perform a straightforward open scene. At any point, the director (or audience, depending) can shout, “Sounds like a song!” (Usually this happens on a line of dialogue.) The student who spoke the previous line or did the previous action must then sing a song

Continue reading:
Sounds Like a Song

Sit, Stand, Kneel, Lie

Rules:

Four players begin a scene. One player must always be sitting, one standing, one lying down, and one kneeling. When a player changes position the player whose position they’ve adopted must justify their movement into a new position. No two players are allowed to be in the same position at once.


Continue reading:
Sit, Stand, Kneel, Lie

Typewriter

This is the classic third person narrative game.

Rules:

Get a suggestion from audience (e.g. Fictional title for a story.) One player is the writer and narrates the story. The other members of the team perform the actual scene that is being told including the dialogue. Players pass the advancing of the story back and

Continue reading:
Typewriter

Fast Forward

A fun and fast scene that heightens listening.

Rules:

Two or three players do a scene. At any point in the scene, the director can call, “Fast forward!” The students in the scene then “fast forward,” like an old-school VCR (bodies in fast motion, voices sped up, etc.) When the director calls “Stop!” the scene

Continue reading:
Fast Forward

Alphabet Game

A restriction game.

Rules

This scene has 26 lines. Each line of dialogue must begin with the next sequential letter of the alphabet. There is no real need to start with ‘A’. Ask for the starting letter from the audience.

Objectives:

To work within the limitations of the rule and still create a full story.

Comments:

Don’t

Continue reading:
Alphabet Game

Backwards Scene

Rules:

The team creates an entire story/scene in reverse, starting with the conclusion of the story and improvising thier way to the beginning.


Objectives:

The team must know the “Basic Scene Structure” so well they can forward the action in reverse (I guess that would be “reverse” the action). Resolution, raising the

Continue reading:
Backwards Scene

Word at a Time: The Practice Game

Rules:

Two players tell a story alternating players on each word. The players act out all action within the scene while it happens. The tell the story in a first person perspective .


Objectives:

To create group mind through cooperational storytelling.


Comments:

A lot of the time this game

Continue reading:
Word at a Time: The Practice Game

In a… With a…

Rules:

Improvisors get audience suggestions to fill in the blanks IN A _____ WITH A _____ (WHILE_____). Scene does not necessarily begin with the suggestions,but may move toward that moment.Or it may begin at the suggestion and proceed wherever it might.


Objectives:

To improvise and justify a complete scene within the rules

Continue reading:
In a… With a…